Limiting social media use reduced loneliness and depression in new experiment

The idea that social media can be harmful to our mental and emotional well-being is not a new one, but little has been done by researchers to directly measure the effect; surveys and correlative studies are at best suggestive. A new experimental study out of Penn State, however, directly links more social media use to worse emotional states, and less use to better.

To be clear on the terminology here, a simple survey might ask people to self-report that using Instagram makes them feel bad. A correlative study would, for example, find that people who report more social media use are more likely to also experience depression. An experimental study compares the results from an experimental group with their behavior systematically modified, and a control group that’s allowed to do whatever they want.

This study, led by Melissa Hunt at Penn State’s psychology department, is the latter — which despite intense interest in this field and phenomenon is quite rare. The researchers only identified two other experimental studies, both of which only addressed Facebook use.

Phone-addicted teens aren’t as happy as those who play sports and hang out IRL, new study suggests

Recommended For You

WP Auto Content - Unlimited

Automatically create content sites with 30 content sources

Ultimate Banner Multi

create banners for ANY product they want to promote in seconds, customising a banner quickly from our extensive template collection.AND manage everything in one convenient admin area... all conveniently inside your WordPress admin area. You can now i

Commission Resurrection - CPR Package

How A British Guy Found The Simple Secret To Driving Massive Traffic Online Which Can Make Anyone $1,416.07 Per Day Automatically!

One hundred and forty-three students from the school were monitored for three weeks after being assigned to either limit their social media use to about 10 minutes per app (Facebook, Snapchat and Instagram) per day or continue using it as they normally would. They were monitored for a baseline before the experimental period and assessed weekly on a variety of standard tests for depression, social support and so on. Social media usage was monitored via the iOS battery use screen, which shows app use.

The results are clear. As the paper, published in the latest Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, puts it:

The limited use group showed significant reductions in loneliness and depression over three weeks compared to the control group. Both groups showed significant decreases in anxiety and fear of missing out over baseline, suggesting a benefit of increased self-monitoring.

Our findings strongly suggest that limiting social media use to approximately 30 minutes per day may lead to significant improvement in well-being.

It’s not the final word in this, however. Some scores did not see improvement, such as self-esteem and social support. And later follow-ups to see if feelings reverted or habit changes were less than temporary were limited because most of the subjects couldn’t be compelled to return. (Psychology, often summarized as “the study of undergraduates,” relies on student volunteers who have no reason to take part except for course credit, and once that’s given, they’re out.)

Recommended For You

Super Affiliate Class - 10 DFY Campaigns

Super Affiliate Class - 10 DFY Campaigns

The Digital Marketing Lifestyle PLR - Deluxe Version

The Digital Marketing Lifestyle PLR - Deluxe Version

Visual Voice Pro 2.0 - XRanker360 Pro Edition [OTO3 - Quarterly]

X-Ranker 360 is the most powerful software that will allow your customers to get GUARANTEED Page 1 Rankings with their videos every single time!

That said, it’s a straightforward causal link between limiting social media use and improving some aspects of emotional and social health. The exact nature of the link, however, is something at which Hunt could only speculate:

Some of the existing literature on social media suggests there’s an enormous amount of social comparison that happens. When you look at other people’s lives, particularly on Instagram, it’s easy to conclude that everyone else’s life is cooler or better than yours.

When you’re not busy getting sucked into clickbait social media, you’re actually spending more time on things that are more likely to make you feel better about your life.

The researchers acknowledge the limited nature of their study and suggest numerous directions for colleagues in the field to take it from here. A more diverse population, for instance, or including more social media platforms. Longer experimental times and comprehensive follow-ups well after the experiment would help, as well.

The 30-minute limit was chosen as a conveniently measurable one, but the team does not intend to say that it is by any means the “correct” amount. Perhaps half or twice as much time would yield similar or even better results, they suggest: “It may be that there is an optimal level of use (similar to a dose response curve) that could be determined.”

Until then, we can use common sense, Hunt suggested: “In general, I would say, put your phone down and be with the people in your life.”

Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

Recommended For You

PLR Bundle Deals V1 Downsell 4

Includes Resell Materials, Squeeze Page With Giveaway Report, Follow-Up Swipes, Banners

Super Affiliate Class - $1k Per Week Edition Discount

Super Affiliate Class - $1k Per Week Edition Discount

Easy Video Wizard

Create Amazing Video Graphics with Just a Few Clicks!

Thank you for taking the time to read our article.

If you enjoyed our content, we'd really appreciate some "love" with a share or two.

And ... Don't forget to have fun!

Recommended

Social Jacker - ONE FUNNEL EACH MONTH

Get Email Leads using Authority Sites and Facebook

Fusion by DropMock 4 Week Training

Fusion by DropMock 4 Week Training

Covert Commissions 2.0 Annual Pro

Annual license fee for Covert Commissions lead gen and list building/management system

Leave a Reply